La plupart des principaux fournisseurs de services Internet déclarent prendre en charge Net Neutrality. Est-ce authentique?

William Lawyer

William Lawyer, Conservative leaning Libertarian who writes about politics

Répondu il y a 45w · L'auteur dispose de réponses 307 et de vues de réponses 789.9k

Yes, this is genuine. Sort of.

Most of the biggest Internet Service Providers, such as Verizon and Comcast, all say they support net neutrality, and, in a way, they do.

La plupart des principaux fournisseurs de services Internet déclarent prendre en charge Net Neutrality. Est-ce authentique?

Let’s take AT&T for example. They have been airing ads declaring their support for Net Neutrality, their executives have come out and said things like “Congress should act now to provide the clear statutory authority that guarantees an open internet for all consumers,” and they have been calling for their customers to support Congress passing laws regarding Net Neutrality for a while now. They have even set up a site to promote Net Neutrality where you can send pre-written Emails to Congress to tell them to pass Net Neutrality legislation.1

La plupart des principaux fournisseurs de services Internet déclarent prendre en charge Net Neutrality. Est-ce authentique?

There are several different versions of these Emails that load automatically, but they illustrate what is really going on here very well. AT&T is genuinely calling for Congress to pass laws on Net Neutrality in these Emails, but that’s not all they are saying. Here’s the text of these Emails:

I am writing in regard to the Commission’s work on preserving an open internet. There is no doubt that the internet has become a crucial part of our economy and way of life. That’s why it’s very important to regulate it in a responsible way.

While I support the FCC’s work to get rid of the rules that were harming the internet economy, I believe the only way to permanently guarantee an open internet is by Congress creating a law that all companies must follow that promotes transparency and prevents blocking, censorship and discriminatory throttling.

Thank you for your continued work on this very important issue.


I am writing today to encourage you to work together and move quickly on a permanent legislative fix to preserve an open internet that is transparent and free from blocking, censorship and discriminatory throttling. I believe only legislation can ensure we have permanent, enforceable open internet rules that apply equally to everyone and won’t change depending on which party is in power or who is running the FCC.

The FCC’s move to make sure the internet isn’t subject to heavy-handed laws created for the rotary phone is the right first step, but only legislation can put this issue beyond politics and ensure that vital consumer protections are stable and secure.

After almost two decades of the FCC and the courts arguing this issue—it’s time for Congress to provide permanent and strong open internet protections to consumers and the entire internet community.


I am writing today in support of preserving an open internet that is transparent and free from blocking, censorship and discriminatory throttling and to encourage you and other members of Congress to work together to pass open internet legislation.

Congress has the power to end the political back and forth and create lasting open internet protections that apply to everyone and will remain in place regardless of which party is in power. I agree with the current FCC that heavy-handed regulations will do more harm than good. But, we need legislation to put this issue to rest once and for all and ensure an open internet for decades to come.


I am writing today to urge you to work with your fellow members of Congress and the FCC to permanently preserve an open internet by supporting bipartisan legislation that would turn the principles of transparency, no blocking, no censorship and no discriminatory throttling into law once and for all.

It’s vital that our country, and our citizens, have strong and permanent rules to ensure that internet regulation cannot change course depending on which political party is in the White House. Passing bipartisan legislation is a step toward protecting it for years to come.


I am writing in regard to the Commission’s work on preserving an open internet. There is no doubt that the internet has become a crucial part of our economy and way of life. That’s why it’s very important to regulate it in a responsible way.

While I support the FCC’s work to get rid of the rules that were harming the internet economy, I believe the only way to permanently guarantee an open internet is by Congress creating a law that all companies must follow that promotes transparency and prevents blocking, censorship and discriminatory throttling.

Thank you for your continued work on this very important issue.


I am writing to encourage you to work together in support of an open internet— one that is transparent and free from blocking, censorship and discriminatory throttling. After nearly 20 years of FCC commissioners and court rulings wrangling over how the internet is regulated, it is time for Congress to provide clear direction by passing legislation that provides certainty for consumers and internet companies alike.

Bipartisan legislation can help end the years-long political back-and-forth around an open internet that creates little more than confusion. Internet users and internet providers deserve clear and permanent rules that ensure the internet remains open and thriving.

I’ve only seen these 6 different versions of the Email so far, but they all say basically the same thing:

  • The FCC should get rid of Title II. (Many people see this as a key part of Net Neutrality)
  • Congress should pass permanent and clear Net Neutrality laws that all companies must follow.
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So, the question is, why are ISP giants like AT&T pushing to get rid of Title II, the law imposed in 2015 that reclassifies ISPs as common carriers instead of information services and subjects them to a plethora of restrictions, but at the same time pushing to have Congress pass more expansive and permanent regulations regarding Net Neutrality?

Well, FCC rulings and regulations are subject to court challenges, endless lawsuits, and can easily be changed or overturned by different political regimes. Having Congress codify widely accepted net neutrality protections could solve a lot of problems.

Maybe these Internet Service Provider giants really have your best interests at heart when they call for Congress to pass Net Neutrality laws.

La plupart des principaux fournisseurs de services Internet déclarent prendre en charge Net Neutrality. Est-ce authentique?

But I seriously doubt it.

I think that the reason ISP giants are in favor of having Congress pass Net Neutrality laws because, in a way, they get to write them.

Democrats and Republicans alike receive tens of millions of dollars from major telecom companies every year.2 Verizon Communications, AT&T, Comcast, they are all huge donors and lobbying spenders that contribute tens of thousands of dollars every year to members of the house and senate, particularly those on Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, and the Internet. In 2014 alone, the amount spent on lobbying by the top four major telecom companies was double that of top five pharmaceutical groups, and trust me, the amount the pharmaceutical industry spends on lobbying is no small sum.34They’ve got officials eating s'mores and drinking Vodka right out of the palm of their hand. Literally.5

La plupart des principaux fournisseurs de services Internet déclarent prendre en charge Net Neutrality. Est-ce authentique?

Now, Internet Service Provider giants certainly do have a lot of influence in the FCC as well. From Tom Wheeler, former president of the Cellular Telecom Internet Association, former head of the National Cable and Telecom Association and a major investor in cable and communications services to Michael Powell, current president of the trade association the National Cable & Telecommunications Association, the FCC sure is cozy with the industries they are supposed to be regulating already.6

Apparently however, the main ISPs have more confidence in a Congress that is taking piles of money from them and that can implement more permanent and expansive laws than they do in the FCC.7 Congress does listen best to money after all, and these ISPs have no shortage of that.

La plupart des principaux fournisseurs de services Internet déclarent prendre en charge Net Neutrality. Est-ce authentique?

Of course, the question is, why do major Internet Service Providers want toutes Net Neutrality laws, regardless of who is making them? Surely having full power over their user’s access to the internet would benefit them the most.

The answer is competition, and quashing it.

La plupart des principaux fournisseurs de services Internet déclarent prendre en charge Net Neutrality. Est-ce authentique?

Internet Service Provider giants can use government regulation to create major roadblocks for smaller competitors and make things more difficult for new entrants, allowing these massive existing ISPs enjoy state-backed monopoly privileges.

Now, this isn’t anything new, state broadband laws and existing Net Neutrality regulations have been used to restrict new entrants and harm competitors since they were passed. Current Net Neutrality laws make several types of business models that smaller ISPs could use to be more viable alternatives to existing ISP giants impossible, and it prevents all sorts of things like priority delivery and specialized handling of packages.

Many small Internet Service providers, those with customer bases ranging from a few hundred to a couple of thousand, have been saying for a while now that Title II regulations have kept them from getting the financing that they need to expand their networks and be more competitive,89and this is despite the fact that temporary exemptions were given a while after Title II was passed to smaller ISPs for many of the requirements that Net Neutrality laws impose on them, 10and Ajit Pai later expanding and extendeding these exemptions for smaller ISPs further. 11

The claims of these smaller ISPs of being unable to get the financing they want are certainly legitimate. Capital investment in ISPs has dropped significantly during and after the adoption of the Title II, doing for the first time since the end of the recession in 2009.12131415Increased broadband deployment requires investment, and considering the lack of access and competition especially in many rural areas of the USA and how even the threat of increased regulatory burden affects investment, this is a serious problem that is harming smaller ISPs and preventing competition.1617

For the problems that these smaller ISPs are dealing with relating to current Net Neutrality law however, these difficulties are minor and things could certainly be a heck of a lot more difficult for them and a lot less difficult for ISP giants. The repeal of Net Neutrality is generating an incredible amount of support for passing laws in Congress which the main ISPs can assure are more comprehensive, more in line with what they want, more permanent than what the FCC could put in place, and filled with more loopholes that can be exploited.18

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So yes, the main Internet Service Providers all genuinely support having Congress pass Net Neutrality laws. There’s a reason that the giant Internet Service Providers are all saying exactly the same thing, have Congress pass more expansive, stronger, more legally enforceable, and more permanent Net Neutrality laws.19

Verizon:

Today, some companies and organizations are taking part in a “Day of Action” on net neutrality. We respect that and applaud their passion. But for more than a decade this issue has been characterized primarily by slogans and rhetoric, and this has not led to protection of the open Internet on a permanent and predictable basis. So we respectfully suggest that real action will involve people coming together to urge Congress to pass net neutrality legislation once and for all.

Comcast:

You can have strong and enforceable Open Internet protections without relying on rigid, innovation-killing utility regulation that was developed in the 1930s (Title II). While some seem to want to create hysteria that the Internet as we know it will disappear if their preferred regulatory scheme isn’t in place, that’s just not reality.

[...] ultimately, we believe the best way to end the game of regulatory ping pong that has been played in the net neutrality space for the past decade, would be for Congress to act and give clear legal authority and legislative direction.

AT & T:

The debate around an open internet has been going on for nearly 15 years. In the end, the issue is never really about what the rules should be or whether we should have an open internet. Rather, the debate focuses on whether open internet rules should derive from the 80-year-old Communications Act or some other theory of Congressional authority because the current law predates the internet. Instead of having this debate again, Congress should act now to provide the clear statutory authority that guarantees an open internet for all consumers.

They all genuinely want Congress to pass Net Neutrality legislation.

Because, in a way, they are the ones that get to write that legislation.

Notes de bas de page

1 Ouvrir Internet

2 One Million Net Neutrality Comments Vs. $42 Million in ISP Lobbying

3 How Much Money Big Cable Gave the Politicians Who Oversee the Internet

4 There's one thing Republicans and Democrats can agree on: taking money from Comcast

5 Time Warner Cable Deal Sets Comcast's D.C. Lobbying Machine in Motion

6 FCC Incest: Meet the Cable Cronies Who Control Net Neutrality's Future

7 Comcast, Verizon, and AT&T want Congress to make a net neutrality law because they will write it

8 Smaller ISPs Ask Pai to Dispel Cloud of Title II

9 FCC's new regulations threaten broadband investment

10 FCC Extends Enhanced Transparency Waiver for Smaller ISPs

11 The new FCC boss has taken his latest shot at today's open-internet laws

12 https://www.ustelecom.org/sites/...

13 http://cbpp.georgetown.edu/sites...

14 http://transition.fcc.gov/Daily_...

15 2016 Broadband Capex Survey: Tracking Investment in the Title II Era

16 The Effect of Regulation on Broadband Markets: Evaluating the Empirical Evidence in the FCC's 2015 'Open Internet' Order

17 http://www.phoenix-center.org/pe...

18 Congress Still Bickering Over Net Neutrality Legislation, Making Passage Unlikely for Now

19 Comcast, Verizon, and AT&T want Congress to make a net neutrality law because they will write it

Tom Higgins

Tom Higgins

Répondu il y a 46w · L'auteur dispose de réponses 58 et de vues de réponses 1.4m

In the case of most ISPs, any support given for net neutrality is only given because they know full well that they are expected to give it, albeit with the flash of a poorly concealed anticipatory smile:

La plupart des principaux fournisseurs de services Internet déclarent prendre en charge Net Neutrality. Est-ce authentique?

Perhaps this isn’t a good picture choice, as we all know dearest Ajit isn’t running an ISP. However, no picture better demonstrates the aforementioned anticipatory smile. Et, he used to work for Verizon. How’s that for unbiased?

The history of the battle for Net Neutrality is rife with hypocrisies. You may remember when AT&T did this, back in July:

@reckless this what I got on my DirecTV today pic.twitter.com/DUI7KqXTjh

— dlwelch34 (@dlwelch34) July 13, 2017

Well, guess what? AT&T is one of Net Neutrality’s greatest enemies.

The CEO of AT&T just insisté that his company supports the core principles of Net Neutrality, but later called Title II “illogical” and “stifling.” For those who don’t know, Title II is the single most important part of the whole shebang.


T Mobile is guilty as well. Many called their plan, T Mobile One, a “blatant violation” of Net Neutrality regulations.1 T Mobile One promised unlimited talk, text, et data. This promise, however, was meaningless. T Mobile slashed the quality of streaming video for all T Mobile One users. Was there a solution? Eh bien, it involved purchasing a “ONE HD Day Pass” or upgrading to the ever-so-pithily named “T-Mobile ONE Plus plan”.

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Of course, T Mobile now wants us to believe that they support Net Neutrality. They claimed:

Equally important à note is this: T-Téléphone mobile is a company that absolutely supports Net Neutrality and we believe in an open and free Internet.2

Truthfully, I’d have more respect for these companies if they came out and said, “No, we really don’t care about Net Neutrality. Now, give us your money so we can f*** you. That’s how it works, isn’t it?"


Remember when Comcast claimed “support” for Net Neutrality the last time around?

“We support permanent, strong, legally enforceable net neutrality rules. We don’t and won’t block, throttle, or discriminate against lawful content.”

Oh, goodie. That makes me feel so much better.

La plupart des principaux fournisseurs de services Internet déclarent prendre en charge Net Neutrality. Est-ce authentique?

Surprising no one, in 2008, Comcast tried to block BitTorrent— lawful content en soi.3

In addition to that, Comcast’s own Executive Vice President called arguments in favor of Net Neutrality “scare tactics” and “hysteria.”

Well, Comcast, which is it? Or, do we need to upgrade to a premium plan in order to unlock your views on the matter?


As for Verizon, you may remember that they were accused of throttling Netflix since 2014. Now, back in 2014, throttling the competition, while rightly seen as a jerky move, was not illegal. On 26 Février, 2015, that all changed. When the FCC votes, as they likely will, to overturn Net Neutrality laws, nothing is stopping Verizon from throttling Netflix or any other site. Of course, every ISP will join in on the fun.


An Internet without Net Neutrality is like trying to get to the greatest party in the world, but getting stuck in traffic. Overturning these regulations is unethical and un-American.

Do you want to save Net Neutrality? Go to battleforthenet.com

Notes de bas de page

1 It's Time For The FCC To Defend Net Neutrality Against T-Mobile Erosion

2 Letter to Consumers about Binge On

3 Comcast Sued Over BitTorrent Blocking - UPDATED

Sebastian J. Paez

Sebastian J. Paez, Inquistion of Inquisivtivness

Répondu il y a 46w · L'auteur dispose de réponses 1.1k et de vues de réponses 1.5m

Voici la chose.

Most ISP’s say they support Net Neutrality, that they won’t throttle, that they won’t block, and yet they are paying this gopher of a Reese’s Pieces lover for the ability to do just that.

La plupart des principaux fournisseurs de services Internet déclarent prendre en charge Net Neutrality. Est-ce authentique?

It’s like saying I’m not going to price gouge you for medicines, I just want the capacité to do so, not that I would ever do it!

Don’t believe them. They are lying to your face so they can pull the carpet from right under you.

If Net Neutraility were to be repealed, then your internet traffic would be controlled, you’d have to pay for porn, and certain sites would be off limits in order to promote their (likely inferior) products.

Twitter would have to be a service you’d need to pay more money for no reason other than these companies want more money. Steam couldn’t be browsed unless you paid a premium on U-Verse, Instagram could be blocked until your Xfinity plan was updated to have the “Social Media Package”, Quora could be blocked by Verizon in order to promote Tumblr or Yahoo.

Not to mention a lot of small websites would suddenly cease to exist since people can’t use their websites because you’d need to pay extra money for that.

For all of you complaining about political ads, imagine if FOX had a deal with your ISP to constantly push FOX news to the fore front of your ads.

But the companies would jamais do that, they just want the capacité to do so. You can Assurément trust your ISP’s.

…right?

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