Destruction on the homestead

Coming home to the farm is (almost) always such a pleasure. I say almost because yesterday was not such a pleasure. As we took in the beauty along our road we approached our driveway and immediately something seemed wrong. Your eyes get used to familiar sights and when those sights are missing it can take a few moments to realize it. That’s just what we encountered.

20160720_173926~2The image stored in my mind of our front drive was missing something, then I realized what it was. Wait, where’s the big stone mailbox? It wasn’t there! As we pulled into our driveway we discovered the remnants of our once proud, stone postal pedestal. The pieces were strewn all across the drainage ditch and not a note of regret anywhere to be found.

There are, of course, a great many other catastrophes that can strike fear or anger into the heart of a homesteader, but this is not one I thought would be realistic. We know all-too-well the habits of bat-wielding fiends on a joyride to destroy mailboxes so we purposely had ours made from the same stone our home was built with. Surely nothing would be able to topple it.

That is of course unless you happen to live right across the street from another home being constructed. The large contractor vehicles that come in and out of that driveway already smashed down one side of our driveway culvert and now it appears they have managed to obliterate our mailbox.

Naturally nobody is assuming the credit for the calamity and the silly general contractor claims there was nobody working on the house that day. I say silly because it was noted by neighbors and even the sheriff deputy who drove by earlier saw workers on site.

I know I’ll get over it and we WILL rebuild. It strikes me as ironic though that we moved to the country for a little more peace and so far this construction site has be somewhat of a distraction from that goal. They’ve been building that house for much longer than it took ours to complete and as far as I know none of our contractors or sub-contractors caused damage to anyone else’s property. If they had I know our builder would have made it right, unlike this character who is covering for somebody.

Oh well, just another day in the country 🙂

These are definitely the dog days of summer

It’s that time of year when I become particularly envious of YouTubers from more Northern climates out enjoying their gardens and the like. Here in Texas we are smack dab in the middle of the dog days of summer with day after day of temperatures near or above 100 degrees.

20160630_191932To say nothing much is getting done outside is pretty much on target. I actually enjoy getting up at 5am when it is only 80 degrees. I can get the animals out to their pastures, clean out the barn, and make sure all the critters have plenty of water before the sun comes. I duck back inside and do very little outdoors until the heat begins to wain again in the evening.

20160616_185529I was pleased with June’s hay harvest. Due to all the Spring rain our 9 acre hay field yielded 19 large round bales. We don’t need or use nearly that much with our little flock, but the farmer who cuts and bales it (and reaps the harvest) was appreciative. I’m  surprised how beautiful the field is right now since we haven’t had a drop of rain in about 6 weeks.

20160715_223544So what do people around here do when it’s too hot to work outside during the day? There’s always work to be done inside since those chores tend to get neglected the rest of the busy year. I’ve also been organizing and downsizing some of my collections that sat in storage for two years while we waited to move onto the farm. We also celebrated our 10 year wedding anniversary by taking our first date in a LONG time. We enjoyed a night out in the “big” city and found some time for some uncommon relaxation during a cool moonlight cruise on the lake in downtown Austin.

There’s about a month left to go before the mercury begins its gradual drop and I’m definitely looking forward to the projects we have in store for the Fall/Winter months here at the farm. We’ll finally be putting in our garden and getting some work done in the “dark forest.”